Doug Bandow

a Senior Fellow, The Cato Institute

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan and a Senior Fellow in International Religious Persecution with the Institute on Religion and Public Policy.

Articles by Doug Bandow

Insulting China for Political Fun and Profit: Childish Diplomacy at Its Worst
China is not known for its commitment to human rights. While the Chinese people remain much freer than during Mao Zedong's rule, President Xi Jinping has been cracking down on dissent inside and outside of the Communist Party. For good reason people of good will in America wish to encourage Beiji ...
Why Not a South Korean Nuke?
Four decades ago South Korea's President Park Chung-hee, father of the current president, launched a quest for nuclear weapons. Washington, the South's military protector, applied substantial pressure to kill the program. Today it looks like Park might have been right.
Playing the "Great Game" between U.S. and China in Burma
Relations between the U.S. and China have grown tenser as the latter has developed economically and advanced internationally. After all, few Americans want to cede their dominant position while most Chinese are determined to regain what they believe to be Beijing's rightful influence. The two are ...
Can Authoritarian China Keep Its Economic Miracle Going?
Mao Zedong, China's "Great Helmsman," died four decades ago. Only after his murderous reign finally ended could his nation move forward. Dramatically. The old dictator and his cronies wouldn't recognize China's capital today. Beijing has become a sprawling metropolis. It mixes high ...
No Easy Way out: a Creative Bargain to Ensure Peace between China and Taiwan
Chinese President Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou recently met in Singapore. Never before has Beijing treated the island's government as an equal. It was a small step for peace, but the circle remains to be squared. China insists that Taiwan is a wayward province, while the vast m ...
China Should Propose Discussions with America to Solve the North Korean Crisis
Many U.S. policymakers see China as the answer to North Korean proliferation. If Beijing would just tell the North's Kim Jong-un to behave, East Asia's biggest problem would disappear.
China's Volatile Experiment
Beijing — Mao Zedong, China's "Great Helmsman," died four decades ago. Only after his murderous reign finally ended could his nation move forward. Dramatically. The old dictator and his cronies wouldn't recognize China's capital today. Beijing has become a sprawling metropoli ...
Further Militarizing the South China Sea May Undermine Freedom of Navigation
In the near future the U.S. Navy (USN) reportedly will sail within 12 nautical miles of islands claimed by China in the South China Sea (SCS). This is welcome news for those who believe that Washington's weakness in the face of China's "blatantly illegal" island reclamation campaign has ...
The Madness of Chinese Communism, Seen through China's Propaganda Posters
Shanghai, China—Shanghai is China's financial capital. The former Western concession today shows little sign of the many bitter political battles fought over the last century. Tourists throng the Bund along the Huangpu River while global corporations fill the skyscrapers in Pudong, across the w ...
U.S. Should Remember the Difference between Being Tough and Being Stupid toward China
Whenever China is mentioned in a presidential campaign, the consequences are rarely good. In 2012 residents of Ohio, where anti-Beijing ads proliferated, might have believed that the campaign hinged on which candidate was tougher on China. Next year U.S. policy toward the People’s Republic of C ...
Why China and Japan Are at Odds—and How the U.S. Could be Stuck in the Middle
Beijing—There are many obscure tourist sites in Beijing. One missed by many foreigners is the Chinese People’s Anti-Japanese War Memorial Hall. The museum illustrates why China, America’s most fearsome potential competitor, and Japan, Washington’s most important Asian ally, often are at o ...
Can Economic Dynamism and Political Stability Survive China’s Battle against Freedom?
Beijing—China’s capital looks like an American big city. Tall office buildings. Large shopping malls. Squat government offices. Student-filled universities. Police and security barriers. Political monuments. Luxury retailers. Lots of cars. Horrid traffic jams.
Exclude China from Military Exercises? Bad Idea
Last year, China joined the U.S.-led Rim of the Pacific Exercise for the first time. However, Beijing’s role in RIMPAC has become controversial. Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain recently opined: “I would not have invited them this time because of their bad behavior.”
Japan’s New Defense Guidelines Encourage U.S. Confrontation with China
Japan has always been Washington’s number one Asian ally. That was demonstrated with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s trip to Washington, highlighted by a speech to Congress. Unfortunately, the relationship increases the likelihood of a confrontation between the U.S. and China.
Include China in 2016 RIMPAC Exercise: “Punishing” Beijing by Exclusion Would be Short-Sighted
Last year China joined the Rim of the Pacific Exercise for the first time. There were 23 participants and six observers. RIMPAC began back in 1971 with just America, Australia, Canada, Great Britain, and New Zealand.
US and China over Others’ Territorial Disputes
The Asian order is under strain as the People’s Republic of China has become an economic colossus with growing military might and diplomatic influence. The PRC is asserting territorial claims once considered impractical or worthless. Opposing China are Brunei, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, and ...
The Ultimate Irony: Is China the ‘America’ of Asia?
The rising nation was full of self-confidence and determined to expand. Its neighbor refused to negotiate in a bitter territorial dispute, convinced there was no legitimate issue to discuss. The new entrant to the international order also challenged the world’s greatest global power, which was ...
Religious Liberty in China: The Key to a Stable, Peaceful, and Harmonious Order
Christianity is thriving in China. Reports that there may be more religious believers than Communist Party members has made Beijing unsure how to respond. Beijing’s sensitivities to religion are well known. Government secular ideology sees religion as offering a competitive worldview to the heg ...
America’s Great North Korea Folly
North Korea has been in a conciliatory mood recently, suggesting a summit with South Korean president Park Geun-hye. Pyongyang also indicated that it would suspend nuclear tests if the United States cancelled joint military exercises with the South. The North’s deputy UN ambassador said ”many ...
Address North Korea by Listening to China
One of Washington’s greatest policy failures is North Korea. Pyongyang’s most recent provocation apparently was hacking Sony Pictures in retaliation for the movie The Interview. More fundamentally, despite manifold U.S. efforts to enforce nonproliferation, the Democratic People’s Republic o ...
After Decades of Conflict, Time to Engage North Korea’s Kim Dynasty
North Koreans have formally ended their three-year mourning period for Kim Jong-il. By custom his son, Kim Jong-un, and the country now are free to move forward without hindrance from the past. But no one knows how they will take advantage of their opportunity.
‘Punish’ North Korea for Cyber Assault: Recognize Kim Jong-Un and Give Pyongyang Some Benefits to Lose
North Koreans have formally ended their three-year mourning period for Kim Jong-il. By custom his son, Kim Jong-un, and the country now are free to move forward without hindrance from the past. But no one knows how they will take advantage of their opportunity.
Bring China and Its Neighbors Under the INF Missile Treaty
As U.S. relations with Russia go from bad to worse, even old agreements seem at risk. Such as the Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles, or INF (Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces) Treaty.
China and the US: Similar Frustrations, Different Policies toward North Korea
China-Korean relations are in a state of flux. The People's Republic of China and South Korea have exchanged presidential visits. Trade statistics suggest that the PRC did not ship any oil to the North during the first quarter of the year. Chinese academics openly speak of Beijing's irritation wi ...
U.S.-China Relations: Setting Priorities, Making Choices
The United States confronts increasingly complex challenges. Iraq faces disaster at the hands of Jihadist extremists, Syria's horrific civil war rages on, and Russia is underwriting separatist forces in Ukraine. Washington's policies are failing. The Obama administration has been doing a ...
There's a Great Deal for the U.S. to Celebrate in China's Rise
Four decades ago the People's Republic of China was a closed and mysterious, even forbidding, society. Mao Zedong and his fellow communist revolutionaries turned an impoverished, backward, authoritarian mess into a starving, retrograde, totalitarian horror. But the 1970s saw the famed opening ...
Lessons for the US: China Won't Work Against Itself in Korea
The American policymaking community overwhelmingly believes that China holds the key to stability and peace on the Korean peninsula. If only the People's Republic of China desired, the Pyongyang problem would disappear. Indeed, Secretary of State John Kerry recently traveled to Beijing to press C ...
The U.S. And China: Seeking Cooperation, But Finding Confrontation
Beating up on China has become a favorite political pastime. This year Mitt Romney, playing against type-an avatar of corporate America-threatens to be tough on Beijing. This strategy might win a few votes but could end up discouraging reform within the People's Republic of China. China' ...