Derek Scissors

Derek M. Scissors is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies Asian economic issues and trends. In particular, he focuses on the Chinese and Indian economies and US economic relations with China and India. He is, American Enterprise Institute

Scissors is also an adjunct professor at George Washington University, where he teaches a course on the Chinese economy.

Articles by Derek Scissors

Should America root for a reforming China?
China has a long, long way to go to be in the same league as the United States If China doesn't reform, it will stagnate A successful, reforming China will challenge America's economic leadership
The U.S. Should Be Wary of Fake Chinese Economic Reform
Better late than never. The absence of pro-market economic reform in China is now widely recognized, if years too late. Much of the world awaits the Communist Party's autumn plenary meetings, hoping for a restart of the process. According to General Secretary Xi Jinping, his new government will & ...
China's Steady Global Investment: American Choices
The tidal wave of Chinese investment around the world predicted by some and feared by others has not materialized and is unlikely to. Various obstacles to overseas spending by the People's Republic of China (PRC) kept growth moderate in the first half of 2013. Energy was again the focus, but the ...
How to Make China More Honest
Official Chinese economic statistics, from unemployment to arable land, are controlled by the Communist Party and therefore cannot be trusted. The prevailing American and global view of China as a rising, if presently troubled, economic superpower is based on this unreliable data. Evaluation of s ...
Chinese Growth, GDP, and Other Things the U.S. Should Doubt
The first question regarding China's newly released economic numbers is not how fast the People's Republic of China (PRC) grew last year. Rather, it is whether stars are aligned for the State Statistical Bureau (SSB) to provide accurate information about GDP and more useful measures, such as hous ...
Chinese Economic Espionage Is Hurting the Case for Free Trade
Trade and investment with China benefits the U.S. This is evident in choices made by individuals and companies every day to buy Chinese goods and work with Chinese partners. Indeed, American business has been the chief proponent of a sound U.S.–China economic relationship.
The U.S. and China: Jobs, Trade, and More
China has the second-largest economy in the world. It is the world's second-biggest trader. It has trillions of dollars invested around the world. China matters. Every day we buy things made in China, though they may be made there by American or Dutch or Korean corporations. China buys a ...
Chinese Outward Investment: Acceleration Features the U.S.
Chinese investment could be a global economic force for decades to come. The potential was underlined in the first half of 2012, when investment climbed more strongly than in 2011. The U.S. in particular saw a rebound. Policymakers should welcome this development by making the American review ...
Clean Energy in China and the U.S.: It's Not What You Spend
There are serious misconceptions regarding China's energy and environmental performance and what it means for the U.S. China is indeed spending a great deal of money on clean energy, but it is doing so largely in response to its own policy errors. The combined results of this spending and these e ...
China Drowning in Money: What It Means for the U.S.
Global financial markets are keenly interested in China's short-term economic direction and policy choices. American policy should look farther. If China chooses to try to stimulate its economy in the second half of the year, even if successful, it will only exacerbate a more pressing long-term c ...
Chinese State Owned Enterprises and the US Policy on China
A lot has changed in a year. In February 2011, the Commission was compiling information on the expanding role of Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Since then, the debate has noticeably swung in favor of those believing that SOEs are a global economic problem, one which requires considerable ...
The Facts About China's Currency, Chinese Subsidies, and American Jobs
There is great concern in the U.S. about Chinese currency policy costing American jobs. But over two decades, there has been no evidence that a weak yuan causes high American unemployment. What American policymakers should focus on is other Chinese actions that do harm the U.S. and the entire glo ...
Tools to Build the U.S.–China Economic Relationship
The scheduled autumn visit of China's next Communist Party General Secretary, Xi Jinping, to Washington is a good opportunity for the U.S. to re-examine its often mismanaged economic diplomacy with China. Policymakers from both parties frequently point to the seemingly exceptional importance of C ...
China and Cybersecurity: Trojan Chips and U.S.–Chinese Relations
One subject of the third round of the U.S.–China Strategic and Economic Dialogue will be cybersecurity. Part of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates's proposed Strategic Security Dialogue, it reflects the growing prominence of cybersecurity in Sino-American strategic relations. The concerns ...
The United States vs. China-Which Economy Is Bigger, Which Is Better
China's leap from poverty due to the marvelously successful market reforms introduced in 1978 has obscured serious weaknesses in its economy-especially compared to the American economy. These weaknesses have been exacerbated by renewed Chinese state intervention that began around 2003. Many seem ...
China’s outward investment healthy, puzzling
In its 10-year history, the China Global Investment Tracker has solved mysteries regarding what Chinese companies are actually doing in transportation and mining, Latin America and the Middle East, and so on. Now it is contributing to a mystery. The tracker shows spending growing only slightly ov ...
China’s outward investment healthy, puzzling
In its 10-year history, the China Global Investment Tracker has solved mysteries regarding what Chinese companies are actually doing in transportation and mining, Latin America and the Middle East, and so on. Now it is contributing to a mystery. The tracker shows spending growing only slightly ov ...